Category Archives: mobile security and privacy

“I Don’t Use Apple Pay Because It’s Less Secure …”

This paper reports on why people use, not use, or have stopped using mobile tap-and-pay in stores. The results of our online survey with 349 Apple Pay and 511 Android Pay participants suggest that the top reason for using mobile tap-andpay is usability. Surprisingly, for nonusers of Apple Pay, security was their biggest concern. A common security misconception we found among the nonusers (who stated security as their biggest concern) was that they felt storing card information on their phones is less secure than physically carrying cards inside their wallets. Continue reading

Social Insider Attacks on Facebook

Facebook accounts are secured against unauthorized access through passwords and device-level security. Those defenses, however, may not be sufficient to prevent social insider attacks, where attackers know their victims, and gain access to a victim’s account by interacting directly with their device. To characterize these attacks, we ran two MTurk studies. In the first study Continue reading

Collaborative Study of Snooping on Mobile Phones Gets SOUPS Award

13483102_1026748250714486_8884387583233611527_oSOUPS ’16 paper on the prevalence of snooping on mobile phones has received Distinguished Paper award. The paper reports a series of quantitative studies that allowed a more accurate measurement of this phenomena. The study was led by our collaborators at the University of Lisbon. It was inspired by our previous study presented at Mobile CHI ’13. Continue reading

What I Love About My Research

As part of Innovate (in October) 2015, I gave a 7-minute “edutainment” talk, explaining in a very accessible form my current research, using an example of a recent study of iPhone’s TouchID:

 

Findings on Touch ID in plain (British) English

My research group had a paper presented at SOUPS on the interplay between TouchID and iPhone security, which I’ve described in a recent post. Here’s a video made by a wonderful team at Kindea Labs that explains the key findings in language accessible virtually to anyone:

Android Rooting:
 Methods, Detection, and Evasion

rooting_methodsUser root their Android (or jailbreak their iPhone) smartphones. They do so in order to run useful apps that require root privileges, to remove restrictions by carriers and hardware manufacturers, and to alter or remove system apps. Rooted devices are prevalent. According to a recent Android security report, Google Verify Apps detected rooting apps installed on approximately 2.5M devices.

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Touch ID: How Does It Affect iPhone Security?

Touch IDRecently, Apple has introduced Touch ID, which allows a fingerprint-based authentication to be used for iPhone unlocking. It’s positioned to allow users to use stronger passcodes for locking their iOS devices, without substantially sacrificing usability. It is unclear, however, if users take advantage of Touch ID technology and if they, indeed, employ stronger passcodes. In order to answer this question, at LERSSE, we conducted three user studies through which we found that users do not take an advantage of Touch ID and use weak unlocking secrets. Continue reading